News Views

15 September, 2017

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Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending September 15th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

TV5MONDE_0
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

This week, we made a splash in Singapore, talking about online piracy. If you want to know more, the press release, other documents, and press clips can be found here. For a chuckle, don’t miss this sardonic take on the news. And then also read this sadder, more impassioned take on the issue, from neighboring Malaysia.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

People asked me, afterwards, if there was evidence that the kinds of enforcement we advocate really have positive effects.  Catching up with reading on the plane home, I caught a headline about a new report from the UK IPO office, documenting that the multiple campaigns underway there against online piracy have been bearing fruit. But the report also documents the extent of the challenges with respect to ISDs, observing that “At its cutting edge, IP crime is innovative,” and that “organised criminals…who distribute set-top boxes are aware of recent developments in the law…. Given recent judgments on the sale of pre-programmed set-top boxes it is now unlikely criminals would advertise the devices in a way which is clearly infringing by offering them pre-loaded or ‘fully loaded’…” A separate report described the types of things pirates do to block enforcement of the laws against them. The conclusion: society cannot rely on outdated pre-IT era laws for copyright; updated laws are necessary.

 

 

Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

OTT News Roundup: If you didn’t make it to All That Matters conference in Singapore this week, you can get an overview of the session on OTT through, How to monetize your OTT platforms: Tips & tricks from Singapore’s Big 3 players. A decent piece on iflix and how OTT players are taking aim at DTH. Aravind from Media Partners is all over the story.  Although the headline is complete clickbait, “Cable Apocalypse:Cord Cutting Accelerates, Sends Shockwaves Through Traditional TV”, it’s worth looking at the charts to see the actual numbers. Yes, “Apocalypse” is a bit of an overstatement. An interesting look at skinny bundles and who is getting left out. To finish off, the trailer from HBO’s soon-to-be-released 9th season of Curb Your Enthusiasm…“Larry’s Back & Nothing Has Changed”. These stories and more, continually updated, on the CASBAA OTT Group Newsfeed.

 

 

Jane Buckthought

Jane Buckthought

Advertising Consultant

Global advertising expenditure is forecast to grow 4% to $558bn by the end of 2017, driven by digital display formats, in particular social media in-feed ads and online video. The distinctions between online video and traditional television are being eroded said Jonathan Barnard, “and the two work together much better than they do separately”. ”Essentially, television supplies reach, while online video offers targeting and personalisation; together they accounted for 48.5% of expenditure on brand advertising in 2016, up from 43.7% in 2010, and Zenith forecast their market share to rise to 49.3% in 2019

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Regulators in Hong Kong had to be pushed by a lawsuit from TVB, but they have finally acknowledged that the world of advertising is changing! The Communications Authority (CA) announced that they would review the city’s outmoded “product placement” rules for broadcast advertising. Hopefully, the review will result in a meaningful liberalization. Note that the authorities make no attempt to regulate product placement nor any other aspect of online advertising. Maybe this regulator is waking up to smell the coffee – if not the fried chicken!

 

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

Sweeping changes to Australian broadcasting regulations were approved by the Senate on Thursday afternoon. Proposed only four months ago, the changes are meant to bring broadcasting regulations up to date so that they continue to effectively regulate the industry, which has undergone massive changes over the past couple of years. In particular, the amended regulations acknowledge the increasing competition from global online content providersThe reforms include: the removal of licensing fees for free-to-air broadcasters; the relaxation of media ownership rules; increased restrictions on gambling advertising; and amendments to the anti-siphoning scheme, among others. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has also promised to investigate global media giants, such as Google and Facebook, to assess their impact on the local broadcasting industry. For a more detailed review, a full list of the reforms can be found here.

 

 

Member News
Additional News

8 September, 2017

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Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending September 8th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

TURNER_new_logo100x100
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

In the world of digital piracy, it’s simply not possible to stop every scoundrel in every part of the world from stealing files (or streams) created by others and reselling them. The goal of fighting piracy has to be a mass-market focus: to raise the cost and hassle of obtaining pirate feeds to the point where the mass of people decide it’s really easier and more cost-effective to subscribe for legal content supply. The guys at Torrentfreak (who know something about piracy) did an interesting little study of the UK economics of “free” Premier League games, and they came to the conclusion that paying Sky, Virgin, or BT was “the only truly reliable solution.” That’s where we need to get to, in Asia.

 

Anjan Mitra

Anjan Mitra

Executive Director, India

People are fast running out of adjectives — audacious, mind-boggling, `most expensive ball in IPL’ are few of them — to describe Star India’s US$ 2.55 billion bid to bag the consolidated global media rights for IPL cricket that may create a monopoly. However, two commentators actually observed Star’s moves may be expensive but not outrageous and if Star can find synergies between its various content delivery ops given its clout, it’s not difficult to recover investments. And, the man of the moment, Star India chief Uday Shankar justifies the winning bid was the “right” one. Though, he joked with colleagues that now he cannot take them out for coffee having gone on a spending spree. Confidence or pragmatism?

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

An Industry research piece in South Korea suggests that consumers viewing video on mobile devices are still favouring platforms such as YouTube.

According to data from mobile market tracker WiseApp, YouTube had a 73 percent share of the Korean market as of May this year in terms of the time that users have spent watching video content. Among Korean services, Afreeca TV settled at 5 percent and Naver TV had 3 percent.Pooq, which is the sole provider of live terrestrial channels, had only 2 percent. Despite SK Broadband and KT’s relative dominance of the telecom market their own services recorded 2 percent and 1 percent share respectively. The market tracker said it surveyed over 22,000 people who use Google Android based smartphones.

 

Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

Some top stories in the world of OTT this week include Disney, where CEO Robert Iger told conference-goers in New York that, “we’re going to launch big, and we’re going to launch hot.” He also confirmed that the ESPN service will arrive sooner, “sometime this spring.” This story quoting BBC Director General Tony Hall goes right to the heart of how OTT services easily cross all borders, maybe too easily for some. And this point wasn’t missed by Carlo Katigbak, President and CEO of ABS-CBN during his keynote at the recent CASBAA Philippines in View in Manila last week when he said, “…OTT providers are subject to very little or no regulation. It is time to think about whether regulations for pay TV are out-of-date and need to be revised ” And to finish off a Q&A with Globo’s CEO on How the Latin American Media Giant Is Competing With Netflix. These stories and many more, continually updated on the CASBAA TT Group Newsfeed.

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Bangladesh’s second undersea cable will finally start functioning commercially from Sunday after a one year delay. The state-run Bangladesh Submarine Cable Company Ltd (BSCCL) could not start the commercial operations because of the failure of another state-run company, Bangladesh Telecommunications Company Ltd to install an uninterrupted inland link from the landing point in Kuakata to Dhaka. Now the cable is up and running Bangladesh will no longer need to import bandwidth from India. Meanwhile in not unrelated news, Australia-to-Asia cable traffic has been affected as the recent typhoons have cut or damaged submarine cables, with operators saying they won’t be back at full capacity until October.

 

1 September, 2017

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Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending September 1st. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

True visions
Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

We’re very sad to report a loss in the CASBAA family; Elemental founder and CEO Sam Blackman has died at the age of 41. Sam was a leading figure in the tech community in his home base of Portland, Oregon, and since bringing Elemental into the Association in 2012, he had also become well known in CASBAA circles, speaking at a number of CASBAA events. In 2015, he and his partners sold the company to Amazon, and rebranded it AWS Elemental. The company has issued this statement:

AWS Elemental has lost a passionate, visionary, and humble leader and the world has lost an inspiring human being dedicated to community. Sam’s spirit will always be at the core of what we do. Sam loved his work, but his greatest love was for his wife and children. Our thoughts are with his family and all those he touched on his journey. The Blackman family has asked that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to three organisations that work in areas Sam was most focused on addressing – hunger, the environment, and education. They are the Oregon Food Bank, the Forest Park Conservancy, and Rosemary Anderson High School.

Tributes to Sam have come in from Oregon Governor Kate Brownlocal business media, and the tech community. He is remembered fondly by many of us here at CASBAA as a sincere and genuine person, and his enthusiastic and insightful presentations were appreciated.  He will be missed.

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Some surprise news from Down Under as American broadcaster CBS has announced it has entered into a binding agreement to buy the business and assets of troubled Australian free-to-air broadcaster Network Ten. The deal, for an unspecified amount, includes Ten’s main channel, its two digital terrestrial television channels Eleven and One and the catch-up TV streaming service Tenplay. CBS will also launch CBS All Access as an SVOD service in Australia and will provide immediate financial support to ensure Ten’s continuing operations. As Ten’s largest creditor, CBS is currently a key supplier of programming to Ten and a 33 percent shareholder in Ten’s digital channel, Eleven.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

I’m always amused when a new journo, or boffin, or politician, discovers that Gee Whiz, there’s a lot of pirated content on supposedly legit Big Internet websites. Shocked, shocked…… But here’s a concrete idea to deal with that: this researcher says that narrower “safe harbor” exceptions would increase liability for piracy, and cause a greater differentiation online between legit sites (which would have a greater motivation to keep their gardens clean) and dirty dodgy downscale piracy sites.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

And while we’re on the subject of safe harbors: The Australian government last week announced its much-awaited decision on what to do with recommendations by the Productivity Commission to bring in a fair use system, and extend larger safe harbors to Big Internet. Answer: they’ll consult on it some more. Well, that’s a better outcome than endorsing the PC’s cockamamie idea that “the way to deal with piracy is to make it easier.” Here’s the official statement, and a lawyerly analysis. Not surprisingly, creative industries reacted favorably.

 

Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

Lots of stories this week in the OTT space. The biggest VOD event of all time, the Mayweather-Mcgregor fight last weekend, resulted in serious outages that exposed limitations of streaming tech. Though, according to Irdeto, this didn’t seem to stop the 3 million people who watched illegal streams of the fight. Turner India and Amazon Prime Video have announced a strategic tie-up that will see Cartoon Network’s popular kids shows play on Amazon Prime Video. Digiday takes a look at how live video is evolving, in 4 chartsWhy Apple and Facebook Should Spend More on Video (subscription, but the chart really puts TV spending in perspective.) For those who didn’t go to the Philippines in View event in Manila this week, during the OTT panel we learned that companies are exploring numerous methods of how to crack the OTT business model code. TV[R}EV believes that Apple should Give Away Their New TV Programming For Free….ya, that’s exactly what the pay-TV industry needs, more programming being given away for free. #sarcasm. These stories and more, continually updated at the CASBAA OTT Group newsfeed.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

It’s been an eventful month for those who watch the evolution of China’s IP policy: the annual crackdown got under way. The Donald announced a Section 301 trade proceeding against Chinese failure to protect IP. At an APEC meeting, China’s commerce ministry acknowledged the IP situation in the mainland was “not perfect.” (Masters of understatement, they are!) And on Wednesday, there was a bare-bones announcement that new IP protection measures (not yet explained) are being introduced. Lots of smoke – any fire? Stay tuned……

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

And for those who delight in Kim Dotcom-watching: if he can stay out of jail, he’s working on helping creators increase online earnings through a Bitcoin-based micropayment system. Just stay tuned to see how THAT one turns out…..

 

Additional News

25 August, 2017

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Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending August 25th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

Star India
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

All the talk about the TVAddons case continues, in North America.   (That’s the group that was pumping out addons to the otherwise-legitimate Kodi software, that enable millions of people to access pirate content.)   So the pirates are devastated that their easy-go-to source for infringing software is on the run.   The tekkies are sympathetic, complaining that the “community” has been muzzled by telcos.  The chief pirate is seeking donations from the public, to fund his legal expenses (but he doesn’t seem to be succeeding too well, having raised only 5-10% of the money he needs.)   And in an interesting exchange in a Kodi forum, the directors of XBMC Foundation (legitimate owners of the Kodi brand) accused TVAddons of ruthlessly abusing the Kodi brand: “We are tired of you using our name to further your own ends, besmirch us, and make money, and as such, I would like to see every instance of the word Kodi removed from your site immediately or as soon as can be achieved.” Well, I guess if your business is stealing other people’s content, then misusing a few trademarks is right up your alley….. Meanwhile, in Europe the Dutch content association is taking other enforcement action against some of the notorious addon builders.

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Sighs of relief at the BBC as their correspondent Jonathan Head has the criminal defamation suit against him dropped in Thailand. A Thai lawyer has dropped his criminal defamation suit against the BBC journalist who investigated foreigners being scammed out of their retirement homes in the country, particularly in Phuket (which is a firm favourite amongst many CASBAA friends). Jonathan Head, the BBC’s south-east Asia correspondent, faced up to five years in jail after his 2015 report detailed how a network of criminals, aided by corrupt officials, stole properties from foreigners by forging land title transfers. Rights groups have said the case highlights how Thailand’s broad defamation and computer crime laws scupper investigative journalism and make it difficult to uncover wrongdoing in a country where corruption is endemic. The story is far from over with a joint defendant still facing charges

 

Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

This week’s OTT news stories started off with a bang as iflix announced they will start airing Disney films including Guardians of the Galaxy, Monsters Inc and Frozen, with plans to roll out a much bigger inventory from January next year. OTT seems to be one of the causes for Turmoil in TV in Malaysia, with Astro seeking a level playing field against OTT players. In the TV streaming players market, Apple TV is slipping against Roku and Amazon. To finish, last month at the Global Sports Summit, Rich Greenfield gave a fantastic presentation on The Future of Sports Media – The War for Consumer’s Time and Attention. Everything he talked about is applicable to anyone navigating this changing TV business. A bit of a paraphrase, but a line that jumped out was, “the one thing holding this entire TV thing together is sports…and if that changes, TV as we know it is done.” More OTT related news at CASBAA OTT Group Newsfeed.

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

In a letter of intent signed on Tuesday, the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) and the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) made an agreement to deepen their bilateral cooperation. The agreement is meant to promote the exchange of information and regulatory best practices in the telecommunications and broadcasting industry by committing both parties to jointly conducting capacity building exercises, collaborating in various international forums, such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and exchanging and deploying industry experts between the two countries.

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Owners of high-end Samsung Smart TVs are crying foul after a software update which has left many of them with blank, or unusable TV screens. Despite TV owners protests both to Samsung and to the press the company has still not fixed the problem – but seven days in (the glitch started to appear last Friday), Samsung still doesn’t have a timeline for when a fix will arrive. The problem appears to affect the latest models as owners of older Samsung TVs are not reporting the issue on Samsung Forums and it also seems that the problems are only affecting European models; there’s no widespread chatter about similar issues on forums or Samsung community boards in other territories.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

As OTT becomes increasingly popular in India’s cities, people are starting to wonder where will all the content come from, to fill the new pipes? There’s certainly lots of interest in content in unconventional languages. The CEO of AltBalaji speculated that by 2020 only 5% of content delivered by OTT platforms would be in English. Hindi is of course the big language, but other platforms were reporting that 30-40% of viewing is in regional languages.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Elsewhere, a battle has broken out in the Indian TV industry, and one clear symptom was this week’s complaint about one broadcaster having too many cricket rights.

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Japanese television is known and loved for having some of the oddest shows and commercials. But one particular tourism ad has been in hot water recently, and is being removed as it was deemed too suggestive. The commercial was made for the Miyagi Prefecture and starred its official mascot, the anthropomorphized rice ball Musubimaru. The video contains suggestive and provocative lines, while there are repeated close-up images of the actress parting her lips and rubbing the head of an animated turtle… but the main problem seems to come from whispering “Miyagi, I-cha-u?” to the above-mentioned  anthropomorphized rice ball. In Japanese pop culture, slowly spelling out the syllables of a word would often connote something sexual. This is further amplified by the word play involved. “Miyagi ichau” would generally mean “Let’s go to Miyagi.” However, “ichau” also means something else entirely. Who knew.

 

Member News
Additional News

18 August, 2017

news_views_header

Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending August 18th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

SES
Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

This week saw the Australian government tip-toing its way thru the broadcast reform bill which  has moved one step closer after securing a deal with  burka-clad One Nation leader Pauline Hanson.  The move  will force the ABC to be more transparent about staff wages and “fair” and “balanced” in its reporting, provide greater community radio funding and foreign ownership reporting. The government phrased it slightly better, acknowledging they had agreed to pursue a number of measures to ensure the public broadcaster increased its regional focus, financial transparency and political impartiality. Earlier, in a move designed to cut One Nation from negotiations, the Green Party stepped up their demands and declared it will only back the package if funding for the ABC and SBS is increased by “millions”. Negotiations over the media reform bill, which has broad  industry backing, have reached a critical stage but with Labor opposed to the legislation, the government will need to gain the votes of the Greens or One Nation and the Nick Xenophon Team  (who are themselves holding up the bill and pushing for tax breaks) to drive the reforms through parliament.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Australian courts have issued a pair of major site-blocking orders, answering pleas from Foxtel and Village Roadshow. Reactions were predictable: Foxtel was happy. The tech press was shocked, shocked that so many sites could be “alleged” to be pirate. Industry group Creative Content Australia said taking out these sites blocks 95 percent of traffic to infringing sites (okay, my skepticism alarm went off at that.) CCA also launched a major effort to deter consumers from seeking out substitute pirate sources. 

Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

Let’s mix some metaphors. Apple is finally reaching into its rather substantial pockets to essentially dip its toes into the waters of original content creation; after years of rumors, the other shoe has finally dropped. Granted, a billion dollars is still a billion dollars, but the tech giant will probably only buy about ten original series with that cash, and will still only be spending a fraction of what Netflix, Amazon, and HBO shell out annually. (Although it’s an open question as to whether Netflix’s US$7 bln spend is rescuing or ruining Hollywood.) Granted, the company certainly has the money to burn if it so chooses, but some critics also question whether Apple’s risk-averse corporate culture will prove a liability in the decidedly edgier world of modern TV programming.

 

 

Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

After the tsunami of BIG news in the OTT space last week it took a lot more effort to uncover interesting stories for you this week…and here they are. Turner has signed a three-year, multi-platform deal for U.S. rights to UEFA European soccer games beginning with the 2018-2019 season and as a core pillar plans to launch a new stand-alone premium sports streaming video service. An interesting look at Nielsen’s Total audience initiative “as the notion of “TV” has fractured, becoming video entertainment delivered across dozens of devices through countless over-the-top apps, video on demand, DVRs, mobile services as well as broadcast, basic and premium cable/satellite services.”  For the massive sports fan, ESPN’s new Apple TV app lets you watch four screens of live sports at the same time….naturally, while tweeting on your phone.  And to finish off, a couple critical looks at the recent launch of Facebook Watch with The 6 Most Important Things To Keep Your Eye On and Are They Smarter than the TV Guys?  More OTT related news at CASBAA OTT Group Newsfeed.

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Taxes, taxes, taxes…….last week I noted that Facebook’s office opening in Jakarta was all about getting them to pay taxes. Now the word filters out that – despite the enormous ad revenues they earn in Indonesia and everywhere else – their Jakarta office is licensed as a “management consulting” outfit. Hmmmm.

 

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

Vietnam is one step closer to its goal of fully transitioning to digital broadcasting by 2020. On Tuesday, analogue TV signals were switched off in 15 cities and provinces across the country. The Ministry of Information and Communications (MIC) had given citizens advanced warning about the termination of analogue services, and has also set up a support program to help poor households manage the transition.

 

 

Jane Buckthought

Jane Buckthought

Advertising Consultant

The Institute of Practitioners in Advertising (IPA) in the UK has formally called on YouTube and Facebook to work with it and ISBA to bring safety, measurement and viewability of online video up to acceptable industry standards.

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

In uneasy coexistence with the business of international broadcasting there is always an element of “state messaging,” sometimes called propaganda. This week’s ham-fisted Chinese attempt at anti-Indian propaganda drew attention to the use of online media by state-owned media outlets to advance political agendas. It’s mildly funny in a racist sort of way, and totally transparent. But one has to wonder – who is the audience for such Chinese attempts to wield “soft power”? Bhutan???? (Twitter, Facebook and Youtube are all blocked in the mainland, so it’s clearly supposed to be “external” messaging.) Or is it a “united front” effort aimed at ethnic Chinese millennials in the western world?

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

India’s TRAI say it has successfully developed an interoperable set-top-box (STB). The new STB is compatible with multiple Pay-TV service providers, and would allow consumers to only purchase a single box, instead of having to replace their box each time they switch providers. The TRAI cites increased technological innovation, improvements in service quality and sector growth as benefits of this new technology, and hopes that it will also help to reduce e-waste in India. However, both industry members and government officials have voiced their concern over how the regulator will manage the issue of piracy that is inherent with this type of technology. Before the STB are released to the public, the TRAI will carry out an industry consultation, workshop and pilot implementation project, which will hopefully address the concerns about piracy.

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

The Thai authorities have ordered the “red shirt”-oriented satellite TV broadcaster Peace TV to suspend operations for a month. But relax, everybody, it has nothing to do with politics.

 

 

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

I’m not usually one to talk about American politics or the U.S. President but this caught my eye, and imagination.  The first high-profile political thriller to broach the Trump era could be coming from an unexpected direction — China.   Award-winning Chinese auteur Wang Quan’an has signed to write and direct American Wall, a U.S.-set feature that will delve headlong into the current politically charged moment. Wang is no stranger to scandal himself and is likely to deliver an explosive interpretation.  Dubbed “a tale of greed, vengeance, sex and ambition,” the film is set around President Donald Trump’s infamous U.S.-Mexico border wall…

 

 

Additional News

10 August, 2017

news_views_header

Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending August 11th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

scripps networks
Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

The BIG news this week is that Disney will be launching two streaming services. “Disney’s online entertainment service will begin in 2019…and starting next year, an ESPN online service, which the company had said was in the works, will feature 10,000 live events a year, including Major League Baseball, hockey, soccer and tennis, as well as college sports.” Other notable parts of the announcement include a big paring back of content licensed to Netflix though “U.S. Netflix members will have access to Disney films on the service through the end of 2019, including all new films that are shown theatrically through the end of 2018.” Also, Disney has now taken control of streaming tech company BamTech, upping their ownership from 33% to 75%.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

And here’s this week’s piracy news: A U.S. judge says posting links to overseas pirate content sources can constitute a criminal copyright conspiracy, in the case of the founder of Kickass Torrents (now in Poland, fighting extradition). A Sydney man was given an 18 month suspended sentence for operating a card-sharing piracy network that supplied more than 8,000 people with free Foxtel TV.   (Two others were previously sentenced, and one got six months of hard time behind bars.) And for this week’s comedy relief, check out the storefront pic of this pirate box seller’s establishment. Charged with selling lots of fully-loaded Kodi boxes, the shopfront’s owner claimed he had no liability for infringement, as people were just finding the illegal content on the internet.  Even Torrentfreak points out that putting “Free Sky, Virgin, etc.” on your storefront might be regarded as “seriously incriminating.” In the end, the dude pleaded guilty to money laundering charges.

 

 

Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

There’s a lot of attention in the Philippines to the issue of how to expand broadband access (and how to improve the quality of connections for those who have access.) Official stats report there are 24.4 million broadband connections in the country, but only 2.4 million of those are carried on wires – which means the other 22 million connections are at the mercy of hiccupping wireless links. Netizens have blasted the telcos for high prices and poor service. Telcos have been highlighting their efforts to improve connectivity, and saying the government’s red tape is to blame. Politicians have been talking about administrative reforms for a sector they call “dysfunctional”, as well as increasing the opportunity for foreign investment, to stimulate competition. Philippine market leaders will discuss what this all means for the video industry, in CASBAA’s Philippines in View conference, on August 30 in Manila. It promises to be interesting.

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Regulating OTT services continues to be a hot topic in Southeast Asia. Indonesia held a public consultation on possible draft OTT regulations (replacing another draft issued last year). (Lots and lots of emphasis on getting social media OTT services to pay taxes on money earned in-country.) But there are still lots of unanswered questions. (Sorry, that report’s only in Bahasa; you’ll have to use your translation app.) Along that line, Facebook is opening an office in Jakarta. A Minister said that “taxes and responsible content” were the goals of “localizing Facebook”. Meanwhile, in Thailand, the focus is purely on content. The NBTC was reported to have changed its mind, and to be no longer seeking to regulate OTT VOD as broadcasting. But at the same time, local ISPs were given until Monday to remove or block 1,800 pages of offending content from Facebook and YouTube. Apparently, the platforms did it, to ensure their services weren’t blocked by ISPs. There does seem to be a bit of confusion, though, as it seems the Ministry of IT had a different list of 3,726 pages to block……

 

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Interesting news from Nielsen in the US which has reported that TV viewing that takes place in a bar, gym, airport or office, can be just as important to networks and advertisers as at-home watchers. The measurement firm found that in early 2017 Americans spent an average of an additional two hours viewing the news away from their homes, the second largest increase in this type of time spent viewing for the genres analysed. Among viewers 18-34, out-of-home (OOH) viewing contributed an 8% increase from in-home viewership. When expanded to the 18-49 demographic, OOH viewing added a 6% increase among those viewers. Here’s Nielsen’s own list of take-aways from the data.

 

 

Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

More streaming news this week. No Disney-style announcement from Fox but, James Murdoch Says He’s “Open Minded” About Creating A Fox SVOD OfferingCBS will roll out a sports-themed, 24-hour livestreaming network later this year, CBS Corp. chairman and CEO Leslie Moonves announced, saying the still-unnamed sports network is “part of our ongoing OTT strategy.” Facebook has updated it’s home page to highlight it’s move into video. “The “Watch” tab and several dozen original shows will start rolling out to a small group of U.S. users tomorrow.” And finally, an interesting look at how No OTT Service Has Figured Out How To Achieve Service & Monetization Parity Across Traditional & Online Broadcasts. More OTT related news continually updated on the CASBAA OTT Group Newsfeed.

 

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

In a week that saw iflix secure over US$130 million in funding, the OTT service provider also launched its VOD platform in Cambodia in partnership with local telecom operator, Smart Axiata. Cambodians are now able to access iflix’s catalogue for a monthly subscription fee of 3 USD. Smart and iflix will aim to cater to Cambodian consumers by working closely with local content producers to offer original Khmer content, and by providing Khmer subtitles for their entire catalogue by the end of the year. Both companies have emphasized their commitment to promoting the Cambodian TV and film industry, and believe that their partnership will help to combat the growing problem of online piracy, which is a significant threat to local content production.

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Hats off to India’s MIB. Confronted with an apparently serious problem of wildcat cable channels from some MSOs promoting objectionable content, the Ministry has chosen to enlist the industry in a serious consultation about how to deal with the problem. (India now has 890 licensed TV channels; the offenders are not among them.) Seeking cooperative solutions is a much better approach than going at problems from the start with hammer-and-tongs.

 

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

Online SVOD services are a big hit in Australia. According to a recent Telsyte survey, more than 3.7 million Australians are now subscribed to a streaming video on demand (SVOD) service, which represents a whopping 30% increase from last year. What’s more, the survey estimated that SVOD subscribers are set to surpass traditional Pay TV subscribers as early as June 2018.

 

 

Jane Buckthought

Jane Buckthought

Advertising Consultant

Walk into nearly any bar, gym, airport or office these days and you’re likely not only to find a television, but also viewers of all sorts with their eyes glued to the glass—from sports fans urging their teams on during a big game to money men tracking the financial markets to travelers monitoring news and weather reports. Nielsen analyzed data to see what content Americans are consuming beyond the comfort of their own couches.

 

 

4 August, 2017

news_views_header

Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending August 4th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

pwc
Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

The deal has been in the works for weeks, and now it’s done; Discovery is buying Scripps for US$14.6 bln in cash and stocks. Discovery CEO David Zaslav and Scripps CEO Ken Lowe are both delighted with the deal, which they say provides synergies that will help the combined company’s negotiating leverage with pay tv operators. The deal is not without its critics, however, who point out that it doesn’t change the fundamental issues in the current operating environment, even though it does lift the merged company higher in the pay TV industry league tables – even as Zaslav says Discovery is not “out of bullets” for other acquisitions. Next up, shareholder and regulatory approval, but both are widely expected to give the green light, and things are expected to be complete early next year.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Sadly, a Singapore court threw out a pirate site-block petition from PCCW, which operates the Viu TV OTT service in Singapore as well as other regional markets. The court didn’t challenge application of the site-blocking law, but it said PCCW did not have standing to sue, as it was neither the owner nor the exclusive licensee of the Korean content that is being pirated. (The fact that it had authorization from the copyright owners to sue on their behalf wasn’t good enough.) The result demonstrates the very high bar, and the very high costs, that current copyright laws impose on anyone attempting to restrain online piracy.   (Oh, and somebody should tell the court that exclusive carriage contracts are against public policy in Singapore!)

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Other piracy tidbits: Another nasty legal battle is joined in Canada, pitting the cable industry against the owner of Kodi box piracy support site TVAddons.com. One judge ordered the cable plaintiffs to give back the domains seized a couple of weeks ago, but the judges in the Court of Appeal countermanded the restoration, saying the case should continue. Dueling lawyers for the foreseeable future, oh joy.  A study in Portugal concluded (as other ones have, in other countries) that site blocking is effective in producing major reductions in use of piracy websites. And Google seems to have awakened on the right side of the bed last week….they removed a host of streaming piracy sites from their search results (in the USA) and also stopped promoting torrents through a “best torrent site” feature.

 

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Figures from analytics research companies monitoring the YouTube Live TV app launched a couple of months ago in the US indicate that around 2 million people have installed the YouTube TV app. The live TV service is aimed at a younger generation of cord cutters and installs seem evenly split between iOS and Android devices. No word yet on whether the 2 million downloads is translating into subscribers — many users may have simply installed the app out of curiosity or could be on free trials that never convert to paid subscriptions.

 

 

Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

Some interesting stories on the OTT front this week. NBCU’s Steve Burke is “skeptical that it’s (OTT) going to be a very large business or profitable business for the people that are in it, and they’re off to a relatively slow start“. At the same time research firm TDG finds that Hulu Subscribers Prefer Hulu to Traditional Pay TV. Amazon has outbid Sky for exclusive ATP Tour rights in the UK…except the four grand slams. And, FreeWheel, the Comcast-owned ad-tech company has found that viewers on TV-connected streaming platforms complete 98% of all video ads.

 

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

Hong Kong’s oldest pay-TV network, i-Cable TV, continues its downward spiral as its revenues decrease and costs increase. Earlier this May, CASBAA wrote about how the ailing company had been rescued by its minority shareholders and the consortium, Forever Top, after its longtime majority shareholder, Wharf Holdings, announced in March that it would stop funding the pay-TV network. Now, i-Cable TV has released its first-half results, reporting that its losses widened by 4% and its revenues shrank by 10%. Clearly, the network’s new shareholders have their work cut out for them.

 

 

Anjan Mitra

Anjan Mitra

Executive Director, India

Historically speaking, the cable TV distribution business in India has been a bit like the Wild West, which has changed somewhat in recent years as regulations and digitization admittedly have brought about transparency. Monopolies still remain in some pockets, though. The Punjab government vowed to break such an alleged monopoly owing to local political patronage, which the cable industry termed as a political witch-hunt. It now seems a good proposal is going awry even as newer players like Nxt Digital enter the state. Not only is the local government in the north Indian state finding it difficult to tackle monopoly issues, a local politician has proposed levying an extra entertainment tax on DTH and cable TV connections, which everybody believed had got subsumed in the newly-rolled out GST. To make matters even more worrisome, the Punjab government is studying a government-controlled MSO model prevalent in another state, Tamil Nadu. Meanwhile, regulator TRAI’s suggestions on barring government bodies from getting into broadcasting and such services’ distribution is still pending at MIB for approval. So much so for change!

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Sky Television, in NZ, has instigated a $1.47 million civil suit against the operator of an ISD network.  The pirate operator issued a press statement saying he would fight the suit, public opinion was sure to support him, the box just allowed people to see what they want, and it was all legal because the streams came from other countries. Somehow, actually paying people who labour to produce the content didn’t enter into his thinking.

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

The Indian government maintains they are not going to set up a new entity to regulate TV content. One report translated this as “no pre-censorship of TV shows.” (India is not China, after all.) The government will continue to rely on self-regulation by the TV industry. But it is also energizing post-broadcast review mechanisms to make sure the Programme Code is followed.

 

 

Additional News

28 July, 2017

news_views_header

Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending July 28th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

now TV
Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

We talked last week about the Game of Thrones juggernaut; turns out the buzz around Season 7 has resulted in a quadrupling of downloads and tripling of in-app revenues for HBO Now in the US. But no good deed goes unpunished; anti-piracy research company Muso says the GoT premiere was viewed illegally more than 90 million times worldwide. Here in the region, hats off to Hotstar for turning piracy into promotion; their “Torrents Morghulis” (loosely translated from the High Valyrian as “All Torrents Must Die”) campaign might not have stopped the pirates dead, but it highlighted the fact that there are legitimate means of accessing the show online. Oh, and apropos of exactly nothing, it turns out Hot Pie is actually a baker in real life.

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

The consumer risks of piracy were in focus this week. A gaggle of U.S. state attorneys general warned of malware on piracy sites, in a series of public service ads. Torrentfreak speculated on how a malicious actor might use Kodi add-ons to infect millions of ISDs. CASBAA’s warning about the same thing got picked up by the Malaysian press. In London, police seized a bunch of ISDs and warned they could have electrical flaws that might lead to home fires. And on the other side, Torrentfreak warned pirates that – at least in theory – they also face the risk of……getting caught.  

 

 

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

UK enforcement report: Site blocking against “Kodi” ISD networks will continue through the next soccer year. The Premier League won a High Court order allowing the experimental Kodi box blocks to continue (after the season resumes) through 2018. This involves a highly innovative process of cooperation between ISPs and rights owners which permits roving site blocks – when a new IP address with game transmissions pops up, it gets blocked. The PL has been very happy with the results – and millions of lads who want their pirate footy are depressed. Meanwhile, copyright federation FACT was busy: criticizing a magazine for brazenly promoting illegal Kodi uses which even the Kodi developers have denounced, and then working with Derbyshire police to close down an ISD network known as BulkyTV. (The promoter was arrested, and lamented that he was facing “time inside.”

 

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Embattled al Jazeera faced more censure this week after drawing the wrath of Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Netenyahu has accused the Qatar-based television news network of inciting recent violence in the city of Jerusalem and Temple Mount. The Prime Minister said he had spoken to law-enforcement authorities demanding the closure of al-Jazeera’s offices and if the closure wasn’t forthcoming he would introduce corresponding legislation to expel al-Jazeera from the country: a move that would also align Israel with the group of Arab states cracking down on Qatar.

 

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

Regulatory uncertainty looms in Thailand. The 6-year term of the 11 incumbent NBTC commissioners will come to an end on October 6th, upon which they will lose most of their authority to regulate broadcasting and telecommunications in Thailand. Under a new NBTC law, the government must select a new set of commissioners to replace the outgoing ones – a process that would likely take months. What has Thai broadcasters worried is that the government has yet to initiate the selection process. Without a new set of commissioners in place, there would be no regulators able to make or enforce decisions about important regulatory issues come October 6th. This has led some broadcasters to come forward and urge Prime Minister Gen. Prayut to use his ruling powers to appoint a new board of commissioners, or at least to allow the current regulators to retain their decision-making authority until their replacements have been identified. In all cases, the clock continues to tick.

John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Apart from the uncertainty over the regulators, there’s also a lot of uncertainty over the future of Thailand’s two dozen digital terrestrial TV operators. Competition is intense, and pundits are saying only 10 will survive. (Also buried in that article is an interesting gem:  According to Nielsen, Turner’s joint-venture Boomerang channel – carried on satellite, not DTT – is one of the top 10 digital channels in Thailand!)

 

 

Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

In an effort to ramp up its anti-piracy initiative, Facebook recently purchased Source3, a startup focused on IP protection and management services. The acquisition has been viewed by many as part of Facebook’s effort to promote itself as a video sharing platform. For Facebook, this has typically been a hard sell to content producers — sites that deal with a lot of user-generated content, such as Facebook, are often prone to rampant copyright infringement. Without effective anti-piracy measures in place, content producers have less incentive to share their products on Facebook’s platform. So, how will Source3 help Facebook change this? Essentially, the startup has developed technology that can recognize branded IP in user-created content and online market places, which then allows content owners to either take action against infringers of their copyright, or simply monitor their online presence. This new technology will build on Facebook’s existing Rights Manager software, which it introduced last year. While Facebook’s problem with piracy is far from being resolved, this deal is certainly a step in the right direction.

 

 

Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

In a week where South Korea announced the successful deployment of its latest  broadcast & telecommunications satellite, plans have been revealed to launch a self-developed multifunctional satellite in 2021. The Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) will develop the rocket and Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) will develop the satellite, according to the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning. The KAI’s CEO was quoted as saying “Our satellite technology has advanced to the level where we can stand shoulder to shoulder with major satellite-developing countries”.

 

 

Additional News

21 July, 2017

news_views_header

Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending July 21th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

NBC Universal
Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

Winter is here again; the penultimate season of Game of Thrones has started, in case you’ve been living in a cave. The premiere crashed Foxtel’s IPTV service in Australia, crushed its previous ratings record in the US, all par for the course with the first global television blockbuster. If you’ve forgotten what happened in Season 6, Littlefinger can catch you up; if you’re confused by the whole thing, that’s apparently kind of the point; if you want to know more about the Targaryen family tree, you’re covered; don’t even ask about Ed Sheeran. But if you are tempted to dismiss it all as just a bunch of hype, pause and consider the vast Game of Thrones Media Industrial Complex.
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

In Bangkok, tongues are still wagging about the policy U-turn that saw the NBTC’s planned framework for OTT regulation suddenly withdrawn. A new policy is now being drafted, but in the interim the NBTC continues to press for action on nearly 3,000 pages on the Facebook and Youtube websites that it says contain “illegal” content. OTT policy is also getting a bit of news in the UK, where the government is requiring porn OTT sites to set up mandatory age verification procedures. You can be sure that not all offshore porn sites will go along, and it will be interesting to see if site blocks are instituted against non-compliant operators.
Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

India’s Reliance Industries has bought a stake in Balaji Telefilms to the tune of Rs4 billion (in excess of US$60 million). Balaji is one on India’s premier content producers and has also recently launched its own OTT service, ALT Balaji. Reliance also provides the largest Data & 4G network in India through its subsdiary, Jio. The Reliance injection of capital secures a 25% interest in Balaji and will help drive the growth of OTT and mobile / “on the go” viewing as well as help ALT compete in the OTT space, both domestically and overseas.
Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

What a week it’s been for TV in Britain. A new Dr Who was revealed to the TV audience after the (male) finals at Wimbledon, a new CEO was announced at ITV and the Advertising Standards Authority are introducing tougher rules on sexist TVCs . All this in a week where the BBC published their annual data on their top On Air Talent salaries. (Hint: If you’re still not understanding, it’s all about gender imbalance)
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

The 27-year old operator of a pirate app store in the USA has been sentenced to 16 months in jail, after a long multinational investigation and trial. Meanwhile, in the UK, there’s a bit of saber-rattling going on, with representatives of the content industry warning that individual end-users could face legal action over use of so-called “Kodi” box illicit streaming devices. Adopting its best tones of outrage, TorrentFreak says our industry is fear-mongering, to scare users off using ISDs. Well, duh….why would we want to do that?
Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

Netflix reported their quarterly earnings this week. They really nailed it on their top-line numbers: overall subscribers crossed 100 million (to 104 million) gaining a record 5.2 mil subs for Q2 and revenues hit $2.7 billion. These results brought out the lovers, “the company absolutely killed it this quarter” and the haters, “one cannot just burn cash into eternity” (referring to forecast of negative free cash flow of $2.0 billion to $2.5 billion for the full year 2017). “Spending $6 billion a year on content, Netflix admits each show now needs an actual audience” but one of their worst shows doesn’t even air on the Netflix.
Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

Here are some numbers for you. Released earlier this summer, the annual Cisco Virtual Networking Index (VNI) has forecast dramatic increases in global IP traffic and online video viewing over the next 5 years. Globally, total IP traffic is expected to increase three-fold by 2021, with the Asia Pacific region boasting the steepest growth rate. Over the same period, online video will continue to claim the largest share of IP traffic, growing from 73% of total traffic in 2016 to 82% of total traffic in 2021. Other significant trends for the TV and Broadcasting industry revolve around emerging entertainment mediums, such as live internet video, which is forecast to compromise 13% of internet video traffic by 2021. New technologies such as Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) will also contribute to the industry’s changing landscape – VR and AR’s share of internet traffic is set to increase 20-fold by 2021. For more facts and figures, you can check out the full report here.
Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

Time again for “one of the biggest cultural gatherings in the world…”, you got it, Comic-Con is underway in San Diego. More than 130,000 fans will descend on the city throughout the weekend, dressed in full cos-play splendour, trying desperately to get into “the most important room in Hollywood”, aka, Hall H in the San Diego Convention Center. In keeping with the trend of recent years, TV will again be front and center, with more space on the schedule than ever. And despite questions about the relevance of the event given the absence of many Hollywood studios, there will still be wall-to-wall coverage throughout the weekend.
Member News
Additional News

14 July, 2017

news_views_header

Welcome to News Views, CASBAA’s news round-up culled from sources across the industry for the week ending July 14th. Curated by CASBAA, News Views keeps you in the loop. We always value your feedback, so tell us what you think!

Brought to you by:

corporate-intelsat
Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

CASBAA members Media Partners Asia are releasing their latest forecast for online video in Asia, predicting the market size will triple by 2022 to reach a total of US$46 billion in value, of which, as much as 75% of that coming from China. The report also highlights the strengths of local OTT services over foreign rivals like Netflix; while also pointing to YouTube and Facebook as the biggest advertising drivers in the space.
Mark Lay

Mark Lay

Vice President, Singapore

A number of other interesting stories in OTT land this week. HBO will make all eight episodes of Insecure season one available for free on its YouTube channel the same day that season two is slated to premiere on HBO. A new research report shows that SVOD gaining perceptual parity with legacy pay-TV and that linear to SVOD viewing really is a generational play. And to finish off an insight from David Bloom: In The Digital Future, What Do Studios Look Like (If Anything At All)? For more OTT related stories visit CASBAA OTT Group Newsfeed.
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Ah, we all hate reruns. But this week the digerati were captivated by an Internet-wide rerun: a reprise of the 2014 debate over Net Neutrality. There was a “Day of Action” on Wednesday which – if you believe its promoters – was Yuge! Everybody who was anybody on the net weighed in. No surprise of course that Goobook was all in favor. Even that dreaded demon, a telco, tried to get in on the action, as AT&T announced it was for NN, too….but not for the Wheeler FCC’s “regulate everything under Title II” approach. If you want to understand both sides of the argument, you can see Google’s official spin here (note the “free and open Internet” mantra), and that of the South Dakota Senator who chairs the Senate Commerce Committee, who says over-regulation risks killing investment in his rural state. Variety points out the similarities of the Day of Action with the campaign against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which died in 2012 after the “free and open internet” crowd alleged stronger antipiracy enforcement would “break the internet.”
Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

The anti-Qatar alliance has launched a fresh attack on the Qatar-based broadcaster al-Jazeera Arabic, accusing it of having “blood on its hands”, inciting hate, violence and discrimination as well as anti-Semitism. The UAE minister responsible for media regulation said that al Jazeera the has given a platform to “some of the most dangerous terrorists in the world” and needed to be subject to new and externally-monitored editorial controls. The remarks about the need for new editorial controls confirm previous UAE statements that the total closure of the TV station is no longer being sought, but instead would be subject to what would amount to a severe anti-Qatari alliance censorship. Al Jazeera for it’s part has said that via video any call for closing down or obstructing access to their channels is an attempt to silence freedom of expression.
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

Clashes continue between Big Internet and various governments. The Vietnamese government said Facebook and Youtube had taken down 3,000 videos with “bad content.” No news this week from Bangkok, after the Thai government hit the brakes on its regulator’s drive to get Youtube and Facebook under control. In Germany, the parliament advanced a law that would provide major fines for social media companies that fail to delete hate speech promptly. Meanwhile, Twitter decided not to pick a fight with The Donald, and said his tweets don’t violate their standards.
Cathryn Chase

Cathryn Chase

Regulatory Assistant

A lawmaker in the Philippines has put forward a new bill that would extend the National Telecommunications Commission’s (NTC) authority to regulate telecommunication service providers. The bill is seen as a means to increase internet and broadband service standards across the Philippines, which currently provides the slowest internet speeds of any country in the Asia Pacific Region. Under existing law, the NTC has little power to enforce more than the bare minimum for service standards, and is liable to civil lawsuits from uncompliant service providers. The proposed bill seeks to amend the current policy act by allowing regulators to use financial penalties as an enforcement mechanism. Daily fines could then be imposed on service providers who fail to improve connection speeds by NTC-set deadlines. The amendment would also grant the NTC immunity from the aforementioned civil lawsuits. We’ll be exploring these issues, and many others, in CASBAA’s Philippines in View conference in Manila, on August 30.
Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

Korea’s KT and its affiliate KT SkyLife have launched an upgraded satellite TV service for cars, combining satellite broadcasting and long-term evolution (LTE) mobile network technologies. The two companies have jointly developed technologies to realize the smooth shift between LTE mobile and satellite networks as well as a smaller satellite antenna. The new service is expected to gain extra momentum on the back of autonomous cars and the companies have pledged to target not only Korea but also global markets, especially those countries with nationwide LTE infrastructure.
Christopher Slaughter

Christopher Slaughter

CEO

Nominations for the 69th Primtime Emmy Awards are out; as expected, the list is huge. It’s also apparently proof that people who work in TV have very little time to actually watch TV, and as a result, the list seems to be favoring buzz over critical acclaim. Which has led to a series of surprising nominations, including, as always, some notable snubs. The final awards will be given out on 17 September, so feel free to spend the summer brooding over the list.
Kevin Jennings

Kevin Jennings

Vice President

After becoming YouTube’s first video to reach one billion views, PSY’s “Gangnam Style” is no longer the platform’s most popular video. That honour ow goes to Wiz Khalifa’s “See You Again,” a song that debuted with the release of Furious 7 as an ode to actor Paul Walker, who died in 2013. “Gangnam Style” held the top spot for nearly five years and the song’s video has been viewed over 2.8 billion times. “See You Again” is currently leading in the race to 3 billion views. No word on whether it’s 3 billion individual people or the same person watching it again and again and again…or not.
John Medeiros

John Medeiros

Chief Policy Officer

I know, I know…..we’re all supposed to love videos. But, to tell the truth I HATE HATE HATE autoroll videos on websites and it seems my impression is correct: there are more and more of them. So I agree with this author: they are a revolting experience.
Additional News